getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5641 

Pectin Gels Enriched with Dietary Fibre for the Development of Healthy Confectionery Jams

 

Lilian E. Figueroa1orcid tiny and Diego B. Genovese1,2*orcid tiny

 


1Pilot Plant of Chemical Engineering, PLAPIQUI (UNS-CONICET), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, AR-8000 Bahía Blanca, Argentina
2Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Alem 1253, AR-8000 Bahía Blanca, Argentina

 

 


Article history:
Received: 12 December 2017
Accepted: 6 April 2018
cc

 


Key words:
pectin, gels, dietary fibre, confectionery jams

 

 


Summary:
The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of the addition of dietary fibre from different sources (apple, bamboo, psyllium and wheat) and pectin mass fraction (0.4 and 0.5 g/100 g) on the physicochemical properties of pectin gels for the development of a novel, healthy product similar to a fruit confectionery jam. A mass fraction of 3 g/100 g fibre was added to each pectin gel in order to declare the final product as a source of fibre. It was evident that pectin content, type of fibre, and their interaction had a significant effect on the viscoelastic and mechanical properties, and syneresis (water loss) of the gels. Since syneresis of the gel with 0.4 g/100 g pectin was undesirably high, only studies of gels with 0.5 g/100 g pectin followed from this point forward. Fibre addition had a reinforcing effect on the viscoelastic properties of these gels (wheat>psyllium>bamboo>apple). Psyllium-enriched gels did not suffer any syneresis, although they showed an undesirable “gummy” property, caused by low fracturability, high cohesiveness and low hardness. Then, in order to improve the organoleptic properties of the gels, we combined fibre from different sources in pairs (1:1). In general, fibre combination decreased the viscoelastic properties of the gels. However, mixing psyllium with other fibre produced a desirable effect on the mechanical properties of the gels, keeping the syneresis at 0 g/100 g. This indicates that 0.5 g/100 g pectin and 1.5 g/100 g psyllium fibre with 1.5 g/100 g other fibre was the best formulation for the stability and texture of this product.

 

 


*Corresponding author:tel3/fax2 +542914861700
                                            email3  dgenovese@plapiqui.edu.ar

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5736 

Lactic Acid Bacteria as Biological Control of Staphylococcus aureus in Coalho Goat Cheese

 

Rânmilla Cristhina Santos Castroorcid tiny, Anay Priscilla David de Oliveiraorcid tiny, Eline Almeida Rodrigues de Souzaorcid tiny, Tayla Marielle Antunes Correiaorcid tiny, Jane Viana de Souzaorcid tiny and Francesca Silva Dias*orcid tiny

 


Federal University of San Francisco Valley, Rod. BR 407, Km 12, Lote 543, Projeto de Irrigação Senador Nilo Coelho, s/nº, C1, BR-56.300-990 Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brazil

 

 


Article history:
Received: 21 February 2018
Accepted: 23 May 2018 
cc 

 


Key words:
coalho goat cheese, pathogens, multidrug resistance, staphylococcal enterotoxins, microbiological safety, technofunctional properties of Enterococcus faecium

 

 


Summary:
The aim of this study is to investigate the bacterial population in coalho goat cheese produced in the semi-arid northeast region of Brazil, to analyse the antibiotic resistance profiles of the identified pathogenic bacteria, to detect the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and to evaluate the addition of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with technofunctional properties for the control of Staphylococcus aureus growth. In the analysed samples, strains of Escherichia coli (N=11), Salmonella spp. (N=18), Listeria spp. (N=6) and S. aureus (N=9) were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR). The most commonly isolated pathogen from the studied coalho goat cheese was S. aureus. Its isolates were positive for the genes encoding enterotoxins A (sea), B (seb), C (sec) and D (sed). The autochthonous LAB with the potential to inhibit S. aureus were identified as Enterococcus faecium. These strains were selected for in vitro tests of protective, safety, technological and functional properties. In the coalho goat cheese food matrix, these selected autochthonous LAB were able to reduce the enterotoxigenic MDR S. aureus load by approx. 3 log units.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +558721014839
                                          email3  francesca.nobre@univasf.edu.br

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5449 

Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation on the Surface and Functional Properties of Pea Protein-Enriched Flour

 

Burcu Çabukorcid tiny, Andrea K. Stoneorcid tiny, Darren R. Korberorcid tiny, Takuji Tanakaorcid tiny and Michael T. Nickerson*orcid tiny

 

 


Department of Food and Bioproduct Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A8, Canada

 

 


Article history:
Received: 30 July 2017
Accepted: 13 July 2018 
cc

 


Key words:
pea protein-enriched flour, fermentation, functional properties, lactic acid bacteria

 

 


Summary:
The effect of Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation on the functional and physicochemical properties of pea protein-enriched flour (PPF) was investigated. Over the course of the fermentation the extent of hydrolysis increased continuously until reaching a maximum degree of hydrolysis of 13.5 % after 11 h. The resulting fermented flour was then adjusted to either pH=4 or 7 prior to measuring the surface and functional attributes as a function of fermentation time. At pH=4 surface charge, as measured by zeta potential, initially increased from +14 to +27 mV after 1 h of fermentation, and then decreased to +10 mV after 11 h; whereas at pH=7 the charge gradually increased from –37 to –27 mV over the entire fermentation time. Surface hydrophobicity significantly increased at pH=4 as a function of fermentation time, whereas at pH=7 fermentation induced only a slight decrease in PPF surface hydrophobicity. Foam capacity was highest at pH=4 using PPF fermented for 5 h whereas foam stability was low at both pH values for all samples. Emulsifying activity sharply decreased after 5 h of fermentation at pH=4. Emulsion stability improved at pH=7 after 5 h of fermentation as compared to the control. Oil-holding capacity improved from 1.8 g/g at time 0 to 3.5 g/g by the end of 11 h of fermentation, whereas water hydration capacity decreased after 5 h, then increased after 9 h of fermentation. These results indicate that the fermentation of PPF can modify its properties, which can lead towards its utilization as a functional food ingredient.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +13069665030
                                          fax2 +13069668898
                                          email3  Michael.Nickerson@usask.ca

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5727 

Proapoptotic and Antimigratory Effects of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Platismatia glauca on Colon Cancer Cell Lines

 

Dragana S. Šeklić1*orcid tiny, Ana D. Obradović1orcid tiny, Milan S. Stanković1orcid tiny, Marko N. Živanović1orcid tiny, Tatjana Lj. Mitrović2orcid tiny, Slaviša M. Stamenković2orcid tiny and Snežana D. Marković1orcid tiny

 

 


1Department for Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, Radoja Domanovića 12, RS-34000 Kragujevac, Serbia
2Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Višegradska 33, RS-18000 Niš, Serbia

 

 


Article history:
Received: 14 February 2018
Accepted: 28 June 2018 
cc

 


Key words:
apoptosis, colorectal cancer, cytotoxic effects, lichen extracts, cell motility, redox status

 

 


Summary:
The aim of this study is to investigate cytotoxic, proapoptotic, antimigratory and pro-antioxidant effects of methanol, acetone and ethyl acetate extracts of lichens Pseudevernia furfuracea and Platismatia glauca on colorectal cancer (HCT-116 and SW-480) cell lines. We compared the cytotoxic effects on colorectal cancer cells with the effects obtained from normal human fibroblast (MRC-5) cell line. Tetrazolium (MTT) test evaluated the cytotoxic effects, Transwell assay evaluated cell migration, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescent method followed the apoptosis, while prooxidant/antioxidant effects were determined spectrophotometrically through concentration of redox parameters. The tested extracts showed considerable cytotoxic effect on cancer cells with no observable cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Ethyl acetate and acetone extract of P. furfuracea induced the highest cytotoxicity (IC50=(21.2±1.3) µg/mL on HCT-116, and IC50=(51.3±0.8) µg/mL on SW-480 cells, respectively, after 72 h), with noteworthy apoptotic and prooxidant effects, and antimigratory potential of methanol extract. P. glauca extracts induced cytotoxic effects on HCT-116 cells after 72 h (IC50<40 μg/mL), while only methanol and acetone extracts had cytotoxic effects on SW-480 cells after 24 h, with proapoptotic/necrotic activity, as a consequence of induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, lichen extracts changed to a great extent cell viability and migratory potential of colorectal cancer cell lines. HCT-116 cells were more sensitive to treatments, P. furfuracea had better proapoptotic and antimigratory effects, and both investigated lichen species might be a source of substances with anticancer activity.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +38134336223 (ext. 233)
                                          fax2 +38134335040
                                          email3  ddjacic@yahoo.com

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5631 

Lactic Acid Bacteria from Argentinean Fermented Foods: Isolation and Characterization for their Potential Use as Starters for Fermentation of Vegetables

 

Gabriel D. Sáez1,2orcid tiny, Leandro Flomenbaum1orcid tiny and Gabriela Zárate1,2*orcid tiny

 


1San Pablo Tucumán University, Av. Solano Vera and Villa Nougués, T4129XAK, Tucumán, Argentina
2Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), Chacabuco 145, T4000ILC San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina

 

 


Article history:
Received: 30 November 2017
Accepted: 24 April 2018
cc 

 


Key words:
fermented vegetables, lactic acid bacteria, starter culture, pickles

 

 


Summary:
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) improve the organoleptic, nutritional and physicochemical properties of artisanal foods. In this study, we selected 31 fermented dairy and vegetable foods marketed in Tucumán city, Argentina, as sources of LAB for the production of pickles. Sixty-four isolates presumptively identified as Lactobacillus strains were screened for relevant technological properties for production of fermented foods. Most strains showed moderate to good acidification (>0.04 pH units/h) and proteolytic capabilities (free aminoacids >1 mmol/L), produced diacetyl and/or acetoin and were resistant to 4 % NaCl. Based on acid production and osmotolerance, we selected six LAB strains and identified them by 16S rDNA sequencing (97–100 % identity) as: Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL2159 and CRL2164, L. plantarum CRL2161 and CRL2162, Weissella viridescens CRL2160 and W. paramesenteroides CRL2163. Relevant properties for pickle manufacturing were further assessed. At an initial pH=4.5 and 7 % NaCl, L. plantarum CRL2162 and L. rhamnosus CRL2164 performed the best with high growth and inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. There was no obvious antagonism among the selected strains that would dismiss their use in mixed cultures. Properties of the selected LAB suggest their potential as starter cultures for obtaining standardized, fermented vegetable products of high quality. The development of these new industrial starters would increase the competitiveness of production and open the country’s frontiers in the canned vegetable market.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +543814310465
                                          fax2 +543814005600
                                          email3  gzarate@cerela.org.ar

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